Panax Ginseng


As an important herbal remedy in TCM, ginseng has been used for thousands of years, primarily for energy production. The main active agents have been identified as ginsenosides, and they are the focus of much published research.[1]

Experimental models show that ginseng and ginsenosides have beneficial effects in supporting the adrenal glands; protecting the gastric mucosa; and supporting healthy body weight, blood hormones, and the gene expression of catecholamine-synthesizing enzymes.[1-5]

Ginsenosides also have immune-supporting and cytokine-modulating activities.[2,6]

Scientific Evidence and Research

1. Kiefer D, Pantuso T. Panax ginseng. Am Fam Physician. 2003 Oct 15;68(8):1539-42. [PMID: 14596440]

2. Jia L, Zhao Y, Liang XJ. Current evaluation of the millennium phytomedicineginseng (II): Collected chemical entities, modern pharmacology, and clinical applications emanated from traditional Chinese medicine. Curr Med Chem. 2009;16(22):2924-42. [PMID: 19689273]

3. Kim Y, Choi EH, Doo M, et al. Anti-stress effects of ginseng via down-regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH) gene expression in immobilization-stressed rats and PC12 cells. Nutr Res Pract. 2010 Aug;4(4):270-75. [PMID: 20827341]

4. Tachikawa E, Kudo K, Hasegawa H, et al. In vitro inhibition of adrenal catecholamine secretion by steroidal metabolites of ginseng saponins. Biochem Pharmacol. 2003 Dec 1;66(11):2213-21. [PMID: 14609746]

5. Rai D, Bhatia G, Sen T, et al. Anti-stress effects of Gingko biloba and Panax ginseng: a compartive study. J Pharmacol Sci. 2003 Dec;93(4): 458-64. [PMID: 14737017]

6. Lee DC, Lau AS. Effects of Panax ginseng on tumor necrosis factor-α-mediated inflammation: a mini-review. Molecules. 2011 Mar 30;16(4):2802-16. [PMID: 21455094]