Turmeric


Background

Turmeric is used in both Chinese and Ayurvedic medicine, turmeric has been shown to protect against alzheimer’s disease when paired with vitamin D. It also promotes circulation, relieves aches and pains, reduces inflammation, can prevent certain cancers and protects the liver.

Turmeric is well known as an adaptogen for its use as a Ayurvedic rasayana, an herb of longevity and positive epigenetic events (cellular effects from external or environmental factors, like taking a supplement). Turmeric as a rasayana supports healthy skin, supports the maintenance of optimal blood robustness, and supports healthy liver function. [1] 

A study performed in 2011 by Western Bioscience, in the Punjab district of India, confirmed that Turmeric has legitimate adaptogenic properties. [2] A variety of metrics of stress responses were tested including:

  • Body Weight
  • Blood Glucose
  • Cholesterol 
  • Corticosterone
  • Reduced Glutathione
  • Memory

The study found that Turmeric helped the body to maintain healthy levels of the above metrics during acute and chronic experience of stress. They concluded that Turmeric's adaptogenic action is based on its ability to support the body's inherent antioxidant functions and help the body maintain healthy levels of Corticosterone. (Corticosterone is the precursor molecule to the mineralocorticoid aldosterone, one of the major homeostatic modulators of sodium and potassium levels in vivo.) [3] 

How Much Should I Take? Is it Safe?

Turmeric as a supplement is incredibly safe, in fact turmeric is used regularly in some of your favorite foods including most Indian Curry dishes.

According to University of Maryland Medical Center, the permissible dosages of various forms of turmeric (for adults) are:

  • Cut root: 1.5 – 3 g per day
  • Dried, powdered root: 1 – 3 g per day
  • Standardized powder (curcumin): 400 – 600 mg, 3 times per day
  • Fluid extract (1:1) 30 – 90 drops a day
  • Tincture (1:2): 15 – 30 drops, 4 times per day

Our daily Nootropic includes 600mg of Curcumin (4.1%) powder. While the safe dosage allows for up to three times this amount, we include only 600mg as a baseline and suggest that additional supplementation be done under the care of your doctor. 

Turmeric is known to be safe and non-reactive. Adverse reactions to taking Turmeric are quite rare though some users have noted slight gastrointestinal distress.


TURMERIC IS AVAILABLE IN OUR DAILY NOOTROPIC WHICH IS SOLD BOTH INDIVIDUALLY AND AT A DISCOUNT WHEN PURCHASED AS PART OF OUR FULL STACK

 

References

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[1] Lazarev, N.V., 1958. Pharmacology Toxicology 21, 81–86. Quoted from Brekhman, I.I., Dardymov, I.V., 1969. New Substances of plant origin which increase non specific resistance. Annual Review of Pharmacology 9, 419–430.

[2] Bhatia N, Jaggi AS, Singh N, Anand P, Dhawan R.; Adaptogenic potential of curcumin in experimental chronic stress and chronic unpredictable stress-induced memory deficits and alterations in functional homeostasis; J Nat Med. 2011 Jul;65(3-4):532-43.

[3] "e.hormone | The Hormones : Corticoids". Retrieved 2009-04-09.